Past Life Addictions energize our present life addictions

 

 

 

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“The meaning of the word addiction in the English lexicon varies according to context. A positive addiction is a beneficial habit, where the benefits outweigh the costs. A negative addiction is a detrimental habit, where the benefits are not worth the negative financial, physical, and mental costs.

Our nation has become a landscape for a variety of addictions. Examples of “negative addictions” are: sexual addiction and compulsion, drug addiction (e.g., alcoholism, nicotine addiction), gambling, egomania, compulsive overeating, shopping addiction, computer addiction, pornography addiction, television addiction, etc.”

Most importantly, where does it begin and why do we do it? I have found that if you have an addiction in this life, it almost always comes from a past life.

These are two stories from my book Footsteps Through the Sands of Time-Past Life Dramas Present Life Lessons illustrating how our addictive behaviors in this life can be energetically attached to our addictions from our past lives.

 

Addictions

Alcohol

Katie came to see me to work on her fears around going out socially to parties, dances, and large gatherings with friends. Katie was only seventeen years old and a beautiful girl.

“Why can’t I be like all of the other seventeen-year-olds and enjoy going to parties and hanging out?”

Intention:

Let’s go back to the root of your fear about going to parties, dances, and social gatherings.

Katie went back to being a young man in a life in the early 1800s in the Wild West. She lived in St. Louis at that time. She had left home at ten years old since her father had left her family as a drunk. Katie saw herself as a drifter.

She progressed to seventeen years old in Boston, where she worked on the docks and drank enormous amounts of alcohol. She then progressed to twenty-five years old, living in San Francisco, where she also worked on the docks. She always had women as one-night stands until she went to San Francisco. She worked, dated, had fun with saloon girls, and the only desire unfulfilled was to travel abroad. Katie had fallen in love with a saloon girl who danced in many shows. When the saloon girl left for another man, Katie left for Paris.

For all of those years, Katie was a drunk and a drifter who had no real ties. She continued to be with many women and continued her drinking. She became much like her father, who left her as a small child and whom she hated.

In Paris, she painted and tried to become a famous artist but ended up dying in the south of France from alcohol poisoning.

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Last Thoughts:

I die alone. Fitting.

Lesson:

Trust

Awareness and Connection:

Katie was saddened by this drifter’s lifetime. She was able to see that she was abandoned and betrayed as a child by her father in that life, then by her girlfriend in San Francisco, then by the artist community in Paris, and finally by her best friend, alcohol, that finally did her in. Katie left that life feeling deep trust issues and coming into this life especially fearful around friends who were connected to alcohol or drugs. Her cellular memory remembered that people can hurt you and alcohol can kill you.

Once Katie was able to see where her fears had come from, she no longer feared friends or alcohol. She ended up having a great time in college, indulging in both.

Katie also understood why she was uncomfortable being alone.

 

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Addictions

Pills

Peter came to see me since he had been taking pain pills and anti-depressants to take away the pain of losing his wife to cancer. He loved Amy very much and could not bear the deep pain her death left in his own body. The doctors were very happy to give him anything he wanted since they knew he was so depressed. Peter almost died from accidentally overdosing on his pills.

Peter got help at a rehab but knew there were deeper issues. He asked if my work could help him with his addictions. I explained that most of our addictions come from a past life and that removing the energy from the past could help him in the present.

I also explained he could find out why he had to walk through his wife’s cancer: what life brought them here together to walk through this Karma. Peter was up for both.

“I am always in pain.”

Intention:

Let us go to the root of your pill addiction.

Peter regressed back to a life in Ireland during the famine. He saw himself in rags and his family painfully thin and dirty. He would go out daily, digging up roots or, if lucky, potatoes. Some days he found none, and everyone would go to bed hungry. Peter was the oldest of four boys. He was ten years old when we first came in.

At fifteen years old, Peter saw that he was the only child left since his brothers had died of hunger and malnutrition. Peter had gone out further and further to find roots and potatoes. About six miles from his home, Peter found an old bottle of whiskey a neighbor had thrown away, and that was his introduction to alcohol.

Peter’s mom was very sick and dying in bed. He tried to feed her the last root he had, but she died anyway. Peter felt very guilty that he could not even save his own mother. His father had left the family when Peter was very young to look for better land.

At twenty years old, Peter was now alone. He had been drinking whisky over the years to hide his pain of loss. At twenty-three, Peter died alone with only his whiskey.

Last Thoughts:

I can’t take it anymore.

Lesson:

Strength

Awareness and Connection:

Peter cried when I gently brought him back. He said he felt so bad for the poor boy in the story. I explained it was he, and he said that was why it was so sad.

Peter had tried so hard to keep everyone alive, as he had with his wife, Amy. Peter knew he would fail but did not know quite what to do. He did not want to fail again but did. Peter stayed strong in order to take care of everyone, and he did his best to take care of himself until he could no longer do so. The alcohol was a great help to endure the pain and problems in his previous life. In this life, Peter once again turned to drugs to help endure the pain of loss. He could not take the loss of Amy, as he had lost so many others from the past life. There, his drug was alcohol, and here it has been pills.

Peter felt “lighter” when he finished his regression. He said he felt he had just let go of the weight of loss he has been carrying around for lifetimes.

 

 

 

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